Weiser, E. L. et al. 2016. Effects of geolocators on hatching success, return rates, breeding movements, and change in body mass in 16 species of arctic-breeding shorebirds.

Weiser, E. L., R. B. Lanctot, S. C. Brown, J. A. Alves, P. F. Battley, R. Bentzen, J. Bêty, M. A. Bishop, M. Boldenow, L. Bollache, B. Casler, M. Christie, J. T. Coleman, J. R. Conklin, W. B. English, H. R. Gates, O. Gilg, M.-A. Giroux, K. Gosbell, C. Hassell, J. Helmericks, A. Johnson, B. Katrínardóttir, K. Koivula, E. Kwon, J.-F. Lamarre, J. Lang, D. B. Lank, N. Lecomte, J. Liebezeit, V. Loverti, L. McKinnon, C. Minton, D. Mizrahi, E. Nol, V.-M. Pakanen, J. Perz, R. Porter, J. Rausch, J. Reneerkens, N. Rönkä, S. Saalfeld, N. Senner, B. Sittler, P. A. Smith, K. Sowl, A. Taylor, D. H. Ward, S. Yezerinac, and B. K. Sandercock. 2016. Effects of geolocators on hatching success, return rates, breeding movements, and change in body mass in 16 species of arctic-breeding shorebirds. Movement Ecology 4:12. 19 pp. <DOI 10.1186/s40462-016-0077-6>

Background:

Geolocators are useful for tracking movements of long-distance migrants, but potential negative effects on birds have not been well studied. We tested for effects of geolocators (0.8–2.0 g total, representing 0.1–3.9 % of mean body mass) on 16 species of migratory shorebirds, including five species with 2–4 subspecies each for a total of 23 study taxa. Study species spanned a range of body sizes (26–1091 g) and eight genera, and weretagged at 23 breeding and eight nonbreeding sites. We compared breeding performance and return rates of birds with geolocators to control groups while controlling for potential confounding variables.

Results:

We detected negative effects of tags for three small-bodied species. Geolocators reduced annual return rates for two of 23 taxa: by 63 % for semipalmated sandpipers and by 43 % for the arcticola subspecies of dunlin. High resighting effort for geolocator birds could have masked additional negative effects. Geolocators were more likely to negatively affect return rates if the total mass of geolocators and color markers was 2.5–5.8 % of body mass than if tags were 0.3–2.3 % of body mass. Carrying a geolocator reduced nest success by 42 % for semipalmated sandpipers and tripled the probability of partial clutch failure in semipalmated and western sandpipers. Geolocators mounted perpendicular to the leg on a flag had stronger negative effects on nest success than geolocators mounted parallel to the leg on a band. However, parallel-band geolocators were more likely to reduce return rates and cause injuries to the leg. No effects of geolocators were found on breeding movements or changes in body mass. Among-site variation in geolocator effect size was high, suggesting that local factors were important.

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